Matt Ober & Kelly Richardson Team Up with Beven & Brock

Matt Ober & Kelly Richardson Team Up with Beven & Brock

On October 9th, Matt D. Ober, Esq. will join fellow College of Community Association Lawyers (CCAL) member, Brian Moreno, Esq. of the Swedelson Gottlieb law firm to present, an HOA Board Seminar titled, “CURRENT HOT LEGAL ISSUES” for Beven & Brock clients. Topics to include: Solar, Elections, Who Is Responsible for Maintenance, Harassment & Bullying, Collections and Amending/Rewriting CC&Rs. SAVE THE DATE Then, on October 23rd, Kelly G. Richardson, Esq., CCAL will lead Beven & Brock’s clients in a HOA BOARD MEMBER EDUCATION seminar. Education for volunteer HOA board members is essential for success as board members. Due to the ever-increasing complex and changing nature of the laws and regulations that impact common-interest-developments staying on top of these changes greatly increases a board’s member ability to succeed in their role, and operate in confidence.   From Beven & Brock Here is how to register: CALL: (626) 795-3282, ext. 886 EMAIL: HOASeminars@bevenandbrock.com Provide your name, your email, the name of your HOA and the number of guests you are...
A Proactive Approach to Controlling Short-Term Rentals in Your Community

A Proactive Approach to Controlling Short-Term Rentals in Your Community

Whether through the Courts, the Legislature or human nature, from drought restrictions to email prohibitions, community associations are often forced to adapt quickly to change in order to govern effectively. In the case of the short-term rental craze, this change seems harder to tackle. Indeed, the short-term rental market is having an increasing impact on community associations. Residents often complain that short-term renters – who are transient by definition – do not treat association common areas with the same regard as resident owners. Most are unaware of association rules and contribute to mounting security, trash removal, parking, and noise related concerns, not to mention the increased common area expenses that come with the increased burden of handling short-term renters. On an emotional level, residents are often uncomfortable with the fact that their neighborhoods are filled with unfamiliar faces, many of whom are on-site for only a few days at a time. The idea of transient rentals in our communities seems at odds with the objective of maintaining the residential character of our neighborhoods. We all have seen provisions in our communities’ documents that prohibit “non-residential” use of a unit, or that restrict use of property for “private single-family residential purposes.” While many associations have adjusted to an increase in tenant occupied residences in their communities, this “business” use of a residence, where unfamiliar groups of people share the common area and facilities for brief periods of time, never to be seen again, is incompatible with everything we’ve come to know and understand about community associations. The short-term use of a residence only adds to the resentment towards tenants who...
Improve Your Board Meetings: Drafting a Code of Conduct for the Board of Directors

Improve Your Board Meetings: Drafting a Code of Conduct for the Board of Directors

A common frustration for managers and association boards of directors is dealing with issues that arise out of conflict with individual board members. At some point we have all heard of the board member who is hostile, disagreeable or the proverbial “loose cannon.” Other boards have struggled with how to rein in the director who consistently advances his or her own agenda without regard to the best interests of the association. Finally, there are directors elected, for whatever reason, who feel compelled to reveal confidential information about the association to third parties. Unfortunately, the Corporations Code does not yet contain a provision allowing the board to remove a director for behaving badly. The slap on the wrist that follows improper disclosure or misconduct does little to undo the damage already done. There are, however, viable options available to managers and boards to address misconduct. In most cases, the most direct option to control improper behavior is censure. There is no more effective method of controlling improper behavior than by confrontation by one’s own peers. Like any disciplinary hearing, the director should be advised of the improper conduct committed and be provided with an opportunity to explain his or her actions. The director should also be cautioned that continued misconduct will result in further disciplinary action by the board to protect the association and could include obtaining a court order seeking to enjoin their conduct detrimental to the association. If the conduct committed is improper disclosure of confidential information, the best option is to exclude that board member from executive session meetings, or from receiving executive session material or both....