A Proactive Approach to Controlling Short-Term Rentals in Your Community

A Proactive Approach to Controlling Short-Term Rentals in Your Community

Whether through the Courts, the Legislature or human nature, from drought restrictions to email prohibitions, community associations are often forced to adapt quickly to change in order to govern effectively. In the case of the short-term rental craze, this change seems harder to tackle. Indeed, the short-term rental market is having an increasing impact on community associations. Residents often complain that short-term renters – who are transient by definition – do not treat association common areas with the same regard as resident owners. Most are unaware of association rules and contribute to mounting security, trash removal, parking, and noise related concerns, not to mention the increased common area expenses that come with the increased burden of handling short-term renters. On an emotional level, residents are often uncomfortable with the fact that their neighborhoods are filled with unfamiliar faces, many of whom are on-site for only a few days at a time. The idea of transient rentals in our communities seems at odds with the objective of maintaining the residential character of our neighborhoods. We all have seen provisions in our communities’ documents that prohibit “non-residential” use of a unit, or that restrict use of property for “private single-family residential purposes.” While many associations have adjusted to an increase in tenant occupied residences in their communities, this “business” use of a residence, where unfamiliar groups of people share the common area and facilities for brief periods of time, never to be seen again, is incompatible with everything we’ve come to know and understand about community associations. The short-term use of a residence only adds to the resentment towards tenants who...